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Who can resist that buzz on your wrist?

Everyone knows the dangers of using a mobile phone while driving. The law is also very clear about penalties for reading, watching and texting on phones. But the road rules don’t mention smartwatches at all. Does that mean you can happily use a smartwatch instead? Greenslips.com.au investigates. Read More

How a big night turns into a big crash

Everyone has wondered whether they are over the limit to drive after a big night. But not everyone asks that question the next morning. Unfortunately, while a quarter of drinkers believe they are still over the limit, a quarter of them still choose to drive. It seems more people are drink driving. Read More

Impatient driving has a price

Any article on road safety always states the big three killers – speeding, alcohol and fatigue. Distraction by mobiles is another, but there are no solid figures. So far, nobody has looked at the contribution of impatience. Impatience could be the cause or the result of all four killers. Read More

What we do behind the wheel half the time

Australian drivers are distracted while driving for nearly half the time, in fact, roughly every minute and a half. Only 5% of us do nothing except concentrate on the road ahead. While researchers are shocked by these results, there is a paradox going on here. Road safety authorities are worried about distraction, but governments and businesses are finding more ways to distract us. Read More

It is faster to cycle, but is it safer?

If you live in Newport and work in Chatswood, it’s quicker for you to cycle than to drive or take public transport. But being faster is not the same as being safer. Deaths and serious injuries from cycling went up last year more than other types of transport. So the decision about how to get around is not as simple as it looks. Read More

Road safety strategy looks broken

For the first time since 2011, all states and territories in Australia will miss their road safety target. The National Road Safety Strategy aims to reduce by 30% annual deaths and serious injuries from road crashes by 2020. A recent inquiry tried to pinpoint why the strategy is broken and what to do about it. Read More

How do you get people to stop texting?

Not everybody is convinced it is dangerous to text and drive. A surprising 68% of participants in Australian research said they needed a lot of convincing to believe in the dangers of texting and driving. If this attitude is widespread, how do we get people to stop texting and driving? Read More

Too many signs for drivers?

Are there too many signs for drivers? It rather depends on who you ask. Road safety advocates think there are too many distractions to motorists inside and outside their vehicles. Driving distracted is particularly dangerous on fast moving highways and in busy, congested cities. Read More

Sleepy drivers crash more

Too many Australians are falling asleep at the wheel and even more are driving while drowsy. Until recently, it was difficult to identify whether or not a driver was drowsy. Victorian researchers are now developing a test, using smart glasses, which is able to measure eyelid movements and blinks.

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Distracted driving – what to do about it

In 2016, nearly three times as many men than women died in crashes on NSW roads. It’s a terrible statistic considering it is usually twice as many men who die. It is worse considering the efforts made to reduce distracted driving to bring the road toll down.

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