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Licencing & Registration

SEP
30

Is driving fatigued just as bad as driving drunk?

Wednesday, 30 September 2015

While delayed response times, drowsiness, and general grogginess could sound like the end of a night out on the town, it could just as easily describe the symptoms for fatigue. When we aren't well rested, our bodies and minds must bear the burden, meaning that we are near-incapable of performing at our best.

As driving is an activity which requires us being alert and responsive, substances that could impair our judgement such as alcohol are restricted or prohibited, depending on a driver's age and licence. However, research has come to suggest that a lack of sleep could have just as dramatic an effect on our ability to control a vehicle as alcohol.

Read more: Is driving fatigued just as bad as driving drunk?

 
SEP
30

New study examines impact of central vision loss

Wednesday, 30 September 2015

One of the requisites for operating a vehicle, whether it's a passenger car, motorbike or freight truck, is adequate vision. Not only do we need our sight to ostensibly see where we are going, but our sight needs to have sufficient acuity to allow us to perceive and react to various hazards in time.

While for many Australian drivers, the eye test part of the licence application is a simple formality, for others it can be a barrier to their ability to operate a vehicle.

Now a new study by Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School has examined the ability of drivers with central vision loss to detect pedestrians on the road.

Read more: New study examines impact of central vision loss

 
AUG
13

Night driving restrictions reduce the crash rate for young drivers.

Thursday, 13 August 2015

For people learning to drive, there are many skills that must be acquired. In addition to navigating different hazards and managing distractions, new drivers must also learn to drive safely in conditions where visibility is poor, such as night.

A study sponsored by the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development found that young or inexperienced drivers were more likely to be slower at anticipating hazards at night. In addition, novice drivers were also found to be more at risk of experiencing acute sleepiness when they were behind the wheel both at night or in the early hours of the morning.

As such, a number of states have regulations in place to limit the amount of unsupervised nighttime driving for learners.

Read more: Night driving restrictions reduce the crash rate for young drivers.

   
AUG
06

Mobile phones a distraction even if you do not answer

Thursday, 06 August 2015

Hazard perception is a key element for safe driving. When drivers are distracted, their ability to recognise and respond to hazards can be hindered, which can in turn lead to accidents.

New research has found that a mobile phone ringing whilst you are driving is as big a distraction as actually answering the call.

Read more: Mobile phones a distraction even if you do not answer

 
JUL
20

Passengers increase the risk for young drivers

Monday, 20 July 2015

Young drivers could be more at risk of a fatal crash when they are carrying passengers, according to a recent study. Young drivers hold 16 per cent of the licences in Australia, and also represent the age group with the highest crash rate, according to the National Roads and Motorists Association (NRMA).

Read more: Passengers increase the risk for young drivers

   

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